2019
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: May, 2018
May 30, 2018

Find the Red Thread at TamsenWebster.com.

Metaphors are powerful because they take one concept and marry it to another one to help someone understand something. They’re a way to create an instantly-shared view of the world. To capture big ideas, you need something big enough to capture both the idea itself and all the subconcepts associated with it, a “meta-metaphor.”

Resources

May 23, 2018

Find the Red Thread at TamsenWebster.com.

“Start with Why” is pretty common advice, but it’s hard to follow. It wasn’t until Tamsen had a conversation with Nilofer Merchant that things shifted into place for her. She said, “change doesn’t happen until we understand the context in which it happens.” In other words, our Why is contextual. The good news is that that’s what the Red Thread is all about: making visible the invisible context for your idea and the change that you’re trying to create.

Resources

May 16, 2018

Find the Red Thread at TamsenWebster.com.

Why do we still buy diamonds for engagement and wedding rings? Because we want to give or receive a symbol of the commitment that we’re making and, of course, “A Diamond Is Forever.” Behind this simple tagline is a powerful Red Thread complete with a Goal, a Problem, an Idea, a Change, and an Action.

Resources

May 9, 2018

Find the Red Thread at TamsenWebster.com.

The conventional wisdom with regards to negotiations is to “argue interests, rather than positions.” The problem is that interests are often so fraught with moral obligations and deep-set beliefs about the other side that we need to go one step further. We need to think about the principles that create these interests.

Resources

May 2, 2018

Find the Red Thread at TamsenWebster.com.

Our idea of what people need to make a change is really different from what information they actually need, and the difference is the distinction between curiosity and knowledge. We want people to be asking questions because curiosity is how the audience moves themselves along the Red Thread.

Resources

1