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Now displaying: March, 2018
Mar 28, 2018

Find the Red Thread at TamsenWebster.com.

When Tamsen first started training for the Boston Marathon, she ended up injuring herself because she was new to running. To train safely, she discovered the Universal Running Cadence of 180 steps per minute, which is the speed the body needs to move to move in its most efficient manner. To keep time, Tamsen created a playlist of tracks that all were at 180 beats per minute: everything from David Bowie to Beyonce to the Beastie Boys.

Putting messages together can often feel like a highly inefficient process, and it can feel like your message isn’t that different from what’s already out there. When you think about the universally true things about how your audience decides to act, lean on the Red Thread to appeal to those universal needs of Goal, Problem, Idea, Change, and Actions. At the same time, keep in mind that, just like all the artists on that playlist, your unique perspective is going to make the universal individual.

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Mar 21, 2018

Find the Red Thread at TamsenWebster.com.

In order to close that gap of the Problem and get the audience from where they are to where we want them to be, we need to make sure they have everything they need. To do that, go back to the Goal so you can show them that they have all the tools and that those tools add up to something bigger than they had in the first place. This is the Goal Revisited: the Goal plus the benefit that going through the Change will have for the audience, the bigger version of the Goal. This shows them that not only have they gotten what they wanted in the first place, but something more is possible with the tools you’ve already given them.

Resources

Mar 14, 2018

Find the Red Thread at TamenWebster.com.

We need to give examples to help people take action, but the challenge is that we’re not necessarily giving our audience the specific examples or actions they need. A C-suite member and one of their team members are going to listen to you very differently, so the examples need to match the mindset of those you're speaking. So what do those actions look like? The three that work best are process, category, and criteria.

The process is the most obvious one: you give your audience a series of steps to take, one after the other. Categories, on the other hand, show you the different areas where the change can apply: to your sales team, your marketing team, your customer service, etc. Finally, there’s criteria. Unlike process, it’s things that don’t necessarily have to happen in order but have to be there for the Change to happen. Mix and match these three to take care of everyone.

Resources

Mar 7, 2018

Find the Red Thread at TamsenWebster.com.

What is the Change in thinking or behavior that you need someone to make? If we’ve already figured out our Goal of an irresistible outcome for the audience, the invisible Problem of perspective that’s getting in the way, and the Idea that makes inaction impossible, the Change is what it all adds up to.

A lot of times, when you’re working on your Red Thread, you actually want to start with the Change. However, a common pitfall is to focus on the actions you want people to take, rather than the Change you need them to make that drives all those actions. The difference is between plans and intent. Your audience needs to understand what the overall purpose of the Action is if you want them to follow through and be flexible if (for some reason) that action can’t or won’t work for them.

Resources

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