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Now displaying: January, 2018
Jan 31, 2018

Find the Red Thread at TamsenWebster.com.

We all need certain landmarks in our messages to help point our audience in the right direction, but are you telling your audience how those landmarks string together? Our audience can only follow us where we lead them, so you need to help them understand why they’re there, what’s important about that, and how to get to the next point. To make sure those transitions between your point are present, Tamsen has developed the TraPIT method.

TraPIT stands for Transition, Point, Illustration, and Takeaway. What happens after you’ve reached a Takeaway? Start back at the beginning and address the next question that your audience has in their heads after they’ve processed your previous point. Start structuring your message in terms of TraPIT blocks, and you can make sure your audience is never lost.

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Jan 24, 2018

Find the Red Thread at TamsenWebster.com.

Sometimes when we get up to give a big talk or presentation, the speech that sounded great on paper suddenly falls flat when we say it out loud. Why does this happen? It has to do with how we process language, which we do by taking in information from other people.

This ability to learn from two perspectives, both ours and our audience’s, is called dialogic processing. We also have monologic processing, which occurs when we don’t have that feedback, like when we’re writing our speech.

How do we activate our dialogic processing? The next time you’re writing something, say it out loud, or even better, to another person. That way your brain can get the additional perspective it needs to make your message effective.

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Jan 17, 2018

Find the Red Thread at TamsenWebster.com.

According to Goethe, all the rope the British Navy uses, from the largest to the smallest, is made with a red thread woven into it. That means that even the smallest piece of rope can be identified as the property of the crown. What’s great about that story is that it represents a different approach to leaving your mark. A lot of advice revolves around stamping your work from the outside: using a strong graphic identity or naming something in a very particular way. While those things are important, they’ll be even more powerful if the core of something is recognizably yours, if it’s interwoven with the Red Thread.

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Jan 10, 2018

Find the Red Thread at TamsenWebster.com.

Kurt Vonnegut had this idea that stories have shapes, but nobody had put it to the test until the Computational Story Lab at the University of Vermont decided to take a look. Tamsen looks at the three story shapes we should use in our messages, and how they correspond to the Red Thread method’s three types of talks: the How, Why, and What Now.

Resources

Jan 3, 2018

Find the Red Thread at TamsenWebster.com.

Here’s the best piece of writing advice that Tamsen’s ever received: after you finish your first draft, go back and delete the first paragraph. Why does this work? Because if we haven’t thought something through before we speak it or write it, we try to make ourselves comfortable first. The thing is, an audience or listener is asking a different question: “Do I care?” If you ramble, the answer will be no.

The Red Thread can help you because it’s about aligning what you say with how people make the decision to act. So how do you start? Think to yourself, “What is the Goal that my audience walks in with that I can help them achieve?” That’s how you get them to keep listening.

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