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Now displaying: October, 2017
Oct 25, 2017

This week we’re looking at Ron Ploof’s work on proverbs and storytelling. Our brains automatically simplify complicated messages. The quote, “Play it again, Sam,” for example, isn’t actually what Humphrey Bogart says in Casablanca. For these messages, our collective consciousness somehow reduces them to what sounds like a proverb. We'll look at how you can use that to make your message stickier, using the Red Thread.

Oct 18, 2017

Find the Red Thread at TamsenWebster.com.

There are many times when we’re trying to figuring out how to position who we are and what we do (our Red Threads) for a particular situation: switching jobs, or expanding our business into a new industry. When you’re faced with these questions, you should ask yourself: are you a fox or a hedgehog? This concept was popularized by Isaiah Berlin, based on a saying by an ancient Greek poet, “The fox knows many things but the hedgehog knows one important thing.” The fox has many different ways to try and get the hedgehog, but the hedgehog’s spines are a pretty effective defense, no matter what the fox may try.

Because the Red Thread allows us to tell any story in a way that makes sense to anyone else, no matter what you are you can figure out how to represent your foxy qualities as hedgehog-y ones or vice versa. Whatever you are, remember that you already have a powerful story that you’re already telling. Make sure your Red Thread makes sense to you, and then you’ll find the way to make it make sense to others.

Oct 11, 2017

Find the Red Thread at TamsenWebster.com.

A great conclusion is one of the best opportunities we have to make sure that our message really sticks. At the end of a message, people want to tie everything together and have it make sense, which means that all you have to do is recap the Red Thread. To do this, you can use a technique called the Red Thread Storyline:

"We can all agree [GOAL], but the problem is, despite no barriers, [PROBLEM]. In order to solve that problem and achieve our goal, we have to understand [IDEA], which means we’re going to have to [CHANGE]. How? [ACTIONS], which means that when we get there we will have achieved our [GOAL]."

Oct 4, 2017

We spend a lot of time and energy crafting our messages but sometimes an audience just doesn’t “get it,” even though it makes complete sense to us. This happens because of a well-known phenomenon called “The Curse of Knowledge.” Basically, our brains have a cognitive bias that makes it impossible to remember what it was like to not know something.

This is the reason that the Red Thread is organized the way it is: we can’t introduce our audience to Change language before we’ve sold them on the Problem and the Idea because they have to make those same steps of understanding that we’ve made. Put yourself in your audience's shoes and you can turn the Curse of Knowledge into a blessing.

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