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Now displaying: July, 2017
Jul 26, 2017

This week on Find the Red Thread, Tamsen looks at Warby Parker to show us a great example of a Red Thread being used to its best effect.

It all starts with the question, “Who am I for?” Warby Parker has narrowed that down with glasses are low price, high design, and that benefit someone in need when you make a purchase. Working backward from Warby Parker’s target audience, we can look at their about page to see how each step of the Red Thread lands with that audience.

Jul 19, 2017

Our brains continually make split-second decisions about what to hold onto and what to let go of. As communicators, we need to make sure we’re giving our listeners the hooks they need hold onto our message, and we do that by making meaning.

 

When you’re looking at how your message is organized, you need to make sure that the pieces of the Red Thread show up either as an introduction to or summary of the information that you present. That way you can be sure you’re giving your audience the hooks they need to remember your key information.

Jul 12, 2017

One of the best ways to get better at crafting messages around a Red Thread is to see how it shows up in other places. Most people aren’t explicitly using the Red Thread Method, but there are some “tells” that signal where the key concepts are in a message or story.

 

In this episode, we look at the most common Red Thread tells, little phrases in other people’s messages that tell you when they’re stating the Goal, the Problem, the Idea, the Chance, or the Action. Paying attention to these cues will help you spot the Red Thread in the wild.

Jul 5, 2017

Find the Red Thread at tamsenwebster.com.

After putting so much work into your Red Thread, you want to be sure that your message will stick. The key is to understand how to engage with different learning styles, but probably not the ones you’ve been taught.

While everyone has heard about the differences between visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners, most don’t realize that studies have consistently shown that those categories make little to no difference with learning. Instead, they point to something else entirely: the difference between a Rule Learner and an Example Learner.

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