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Now displaying: May, 2017
May 31, 2017

What do you do when you have less time to present your pitch or speech than you thought you had? It can be terrifying, especially if you’re not in charge of what the product of that edited message is going to be. In this episode of Find the Red Thread, we take a look at just how much power a great Red Thread can have by examining a video summary of a clip of Sheryl Sandberg’s 2017 Commencement Address to Virginia Tech.

Tamsen breaks down the video summary of clip of Sandberg’s talk to highlight how her Goal, Problem, Idea, and Change statements create a strong throughline that survives even a huge edit. If you build your message up from the Red Thread you can easily expand it for a larger presentation, but you also know what you need to hit for a shorter version that has the same impact as the full talk.

Want more information on how to find your (or your organization's) Red Thread? Find that and more at TamsenWebster.com.

May 26, 2017

Presence is something we all aspire to cultivate, but it’s something we struggle to define. It’s easy to tell when it’s not there, but figuring out how to get it is a different story entirely. To a certain extent, the question itself is leading us astray: presence isn’t something we can go get, it’s the product of other things.

Tamsen uses a demonstration to illustrate the three important elements of presence, to help you figure out what you need in your message. When you combine a clear Red Thread with a solid platform and tie it to your audience, you’ll have everything you need to bring presence to what you do.

Want more information on how to find your (or your organization's) Red Thread? Find that and more at TamsenWebster.com.

May 17, 2017

When we’re looking for a job, we often get fixated on a single question: “What should I do?” But this can get us off track, and distract us from asking ourselves what will make us feel truly comfortable, powerful, and strong in that new job. This is where your Red Thread comes in.

If you’re looking at where you are right now and you’re not sure if you should stay, look at the concepts of problem, idea, and change, and see if they match up between you and your employer.

Want more information on how to find your (or your organization's) Red Thread? Find that and more at TamsenWebster.com.

May 11, 2017

How do you make your message more interesting? As Nick Morgan says, “the difference between a story and an anecdote is the presence of conflict.” Suspense creates anticipation around what the answer might be, which automatically gets people more involved in what you’re saying. Rather than tell, we need to reveal.

When we’re putting messages together, it’s critical to figure out how to put conflict into place. The format of the Red Thread can help you because you’re always looking for what the problem is that’s getting in the way of the goal. When you’re looking at your message, ask yourself: are you giving away what you want people to do too soon?

Want more information on how to find your (or your organization's) Red Thread? Find that and more at TamsenWebster.com.

May 4, 2017

What we often miss when we’re putting together a message is the mindset of the person that we’re talking to. There’s two phases when we’re making a decision: first we gather information, and then we look at that information in order to make a choice. People have to learn about something before they’re going to do something.

The key is to understand where your audience is in this process. If you’re talking to someone in the learning phase, you’re going to put them off by pushing them to buy or do something before they’re ready. You need to know where your audience is in their journey, and use the Red Thread to focus in on reaching them where they are.

Get more tips and tricks on finding the Red Thread at tamsenwebster.com.

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